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>>> good morning. a responsibility to act. president obama defends his decision to involvele the u.s. military in libya but vowed our troops will not be used to overthrow moammar gadhafi by force. >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> did the president say enough to quiet his critics? >> prince harry joins a punishing expedition to the north pole. we are with him live. >> and buried. a snow boarder crashes and becomes trapped upside down in six feet of snow. his helmet camera captured it all including a desperate call to his wife. >> i'm stuck in a tree well. give them my phone number. >> are you serious? >> i'm going to die if they don't find me. >> luckily, she did and he was finally rescued. he's sharing his story with us finally rescued. he's sharing his story with us today, tuesday, march 29, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this tuesday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm matt lauer. president obama vowed america's role would be limited in libya last night. he told the nation we had fulfilled the pledge, we had done wha
, but despite eight days of bombing the u.s. says military ground forces loyal to president gadhafi still pose a significant threat. on monday, president obama will address the nation on the libyan crisis. >>> disaster in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in
>>> good morning. breaking news, a defense department official tells nbc news a u.s. f-15 fighter jet has crashed in libya. we are live with the latest on the fate of the crew. >>> back to work. crews return to the damaged nuclear plant in japan to try to stop the smoke, steam and radiation that's escaping. this morning they have hit a new snag when it comes to re-establishing power to the facility. >>> and sorry, charlie. just two weeks after giving him the boot, cbs is reportedly in talks to bring charlie sheen back to "two and a half men." but after everything each side has said, can anyone say they are winning today? has said, can anyone say they are winning today? tuesday, march 22, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and good morning. welcome to "today" on a tuesday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm ann curry in for meredith. the crash of a u.s. fighter jet happened overnight near the city of benghazi. the cause was likely mechanical. >> the pilots ejected and one crew member has been recovered. the other is what they are calling in the process of being rec
? leave her. >> as we said, our nic robertson is staying at the hotel where it happened. he joins us live now from there. who is this woman and where is she now? >> reporter: she is a middle class woman who lives in tripoli. her tribal name means -- or implies that she is from benghazi in the east of the country and apparently that's what got her into so much trouble. she says when she stopped at a government checkpoint, she came to this hotel because she wanted to tell her story. this is the international journalists were but it reveals perhaps exactly what the opposition fear, what they say happens and how their voices are stifled by the government. it was a very, very shocking event when it took place here. [ speaking foreign language ] she came to tell her story to the only people she thought would listen. international journalists in a city hotel. they're all libyans she calls out. why don't you treat us the same? she claims to have been picked up at a government checkpoint, tied, beaten and raped. her name is imam el abady. my honor was violated by them. it is the first time anyone
. but you never know. i think all of us who loved her a lot had seen her get through so many extraordinary illnesses. in my case, you know, i sort of watched her over the past 20, 25 years, and she had been very sick many times, and she always had this extraordinary life force, and she sort of pushed through and came back. and i think we all thought that would be the case again, and definitely fervently hoped that. so it -- it's kind of shattering. and i think everybody around her, her very close friends and her family, are just devastated. >> you know, i was trying to think overnight, sally, about why it was that people around the world seemed to identify with her so much. none of us live a life like the one elizabeth taylor lived. and yet perhaps it was the fragility of her that allowed us to identify with her. she had ups and downs like all of us, turbulence, health issues, addiction. is that what you think made people really recognize her? >> i think that's definitely part of it. that she had these real challenges, and she was very honest about them. she was very authentic. i mean, eve
on the constitutionality of mandatory health care but don't want to talk about who pays for the uninsured. that would be us. unless we let them die. what does that cost every year, both financially and in human misery? thanks as always for your comments and continue to the conversation facebook.com/carolcnn. >> thank you, carol. >>> cnn newsroom continues right now with randi kaye in for ali velshi. >> thank you. we're on top of four big stories this hour. allies making inroads in libya. japan reacting to radioactive tap water in tokyo. the first terrorist bombing in jerusalem since 2004. and the passing of a ledged age. that word is sadly overused but no one wore it better than elizabeth taylor. remarking on her death today at 79, taylor's friend elton john said, we have just lost a hollywood giant. more importantly, we have lost an incredible human being. taylor had suffered for years from congestive heart failure and was hospitalized in los angeles for weeks. a former cnn colleague knew elizabeth taylor well and spoke with her many times on the air and off. we're talking about larry king. he joins me no
to come get us. >> reporter: outside columbus, ohio, 60 weather-related wrecks reported in less than three hours on sunday, blamed on icy roads. in buffalo, sunday snowfall pushed the season total past 100 inches. people just want winter to end. >> i'm ready for spring to get here, baseball to start. >> reporter: the worst was in rayne, louisiana. this security camera shows the tornado that touched down saturday with 135 miles per hour winds leaving shattered glass, and mud-soaked debris. one young mother was killed. authorities say she died sheltering her 1-year-old daughter as fierce winds brought down a tree on their house. 1500 people were forced from their homes by the twister. >> it was total chaos to be honest with you. >> reporter: it's going to be chaotic for the morning rush hour in syracuse. syracuse is now closing in on their fourth snowiest season on record. 170 inches so far, and counting. if you do the math that's over 14 feet of snow. matt, i don't know if you want to hear this but it can snow in syracuse into mid may. >> not that i don't want to hear it, but people in syra
, but a dog gave birth do 18 puppies. all the pups and their owners will join live us live. >> i love the little noises they make. >> so a lot coming up, but let's start with libya. fresh reports that rebel fighters have retaken a city. this comes as president obama prepares to address the nation on a mission still very much in debate. richard engel reports. >> reporter: throughout desert, behind the rebel's front line, we follow a secret convoy to bring water and fuel to the the people of ajdabiya, a rebel city still partially held by gadhafi forces. we reach ajdabiya's eastern gate. it's controlled by rebels. and marked by a tattered flag. ajdabiya is mostly deserted, an urban war zone. shops are closed or destroyed. there is to power or running water. just fighting between the revolutionaries and gadhafi's men, says this man. through a broken gate, we enter his home. it was badly damaged by gadhafi's troops. this is shrapnel from the tank round that hit his out and went right in this room. and the fighting isn't over. outside, we hear gunfire. gadhafi's troops are just a few blocks
's drinking level. robert bazell joins us again this morning. hey, bob. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, ann. we have to point out that the levels of radiation in the drinking water in tokyo are much lower than they are in many cities in the world. as you point out, infants might be at some risk. it has to be unsettling for parents. there is another indication of as long as the reactor keeps spewing radiation we'll have more problems. at the reactor there is hopeful news but more problems, an indication that this is not coming to an end. at this water plant that serves the greater tokyo area, officials found radioactive iodine twice as high as the standard for infants. parents were told to give infants only bottled water. again today black smoke from reactor number 3 forced workers to temporarily evacuate the site. with radiation continuing to leak from the plant workers hooked up power lines to all six reactors. it could be weeks before the cooling systems are operational. reactor 1 reached dangerous temperatures today. work at reactor 2 halted after high levels of radiation we
health problems over the years. more details later on. nato said it will start using warships to enforce a united nations arms embargo against libya. also, u.s.-led coalition aircraft attack a base used by moammar gadhafi's forces to strike at the rebel-held city of misrata. president obama flies home from el salvador today and says a plan to hold off the leadership role in libya will go into effect this week. radiation levels in tokyo's water supply are now too high for infants. they are telling parents to use bottled water instead. meantime workers trying to stop radiation leaks at a damaged nuclear power plant were temporarily evacuated today when smoke rose from the complex again. detroit's population has plummeted by 25% over the past decade. this according to startling new census data. the former industrial powerhouse now has the smallest population its had since 1910. google's plan to digitize every book ever published and distribute them online has been rejected by a federal judge. over 15 million books have been scanned in the project that would have created the largest digital
the coast to force an arms embargo. jim maceda is live in tripoli, what can you tell us about the latest air strikes on gadhafi's forces around misrata? >> reporter: hi there, willie, that's right, there are now more and more of these air strikes happening in that part of the country, which is much closer to us, miss rat rata about 100 milt of tripoli, there's an indication in place than it was a couple days a go. we are hearing reports, not directly from misrata, from others in misrata, calling relatives outside and then we're picking up information from that, suggesting that there are now, has been a series of air attacks, assaults, bombings, on to the pro-gadhafi forces, and that includes tanks, it includes snipers. it includes obviously troops, mortar rounds -- mortar -- mortar men, and they are still in the -- in the outskirts of misrata and have been doing that every day, penetrating to the center, fighting, intensively, often nine, ten, yesterday, in fact, 40 killed, and then pulling back. trying to squeeze at the same time as they attack misrata, trying to squeeze the city. they've c
was for it before he was against it. >> it's whatever he can use to make some -- >> don't be so cynical. mike barnicle, seemed like a good idea until obama did it, now it just makes no sense at all. >> that's what i was going to m working overtime with newt. we have a couple clips portraying just exactly what you pointed out, joe. three weeks ago he's for doing exactly what president obama did and all of a sudden innocent last three days he's opposed everything president obama has done. >> can i pretend to disagree? >> yes. >> try. >> you can. give it a try. >> he was for intervention, then he thought it was too late and he didn't like the way it was executed in a multilateral way. if you're going for newt inconsistencies and hypocrisies, this one doesn't move the needle for me. >> just admit you've now salvaged the newt gingrich chapter of game change two, halperin. he's still talking to you. willie geist, before we get to news, i'm telling you, people are -- i'm dead serious. mark halperin talked about this in his note. it may be in vogue to make fun of donald trump's presidential run but w
. as well as a major hail storm there. we're going to get the latest in a live report. al will give us the forecast in a couple of minutes. >> in the meantime, we'll get our first look inside the nuclear power plant in japan. you can see the dangerous and dark conditions those heroic workers are battling as they try to restore power to the reactors. and overnight, two workers had to be rushed to the hospital after being exposed to radioactive elements. we'll get details in a live report this morning. >> here's the question that i think will be of interest to a lot of parents out there. how far should a school go to protect one student with a severe peanut allergy? parents are in an uproar over the strict new rules put in place in an elementary school in florida. they claim what's being done there to keep one child safe is hurting other kids' education. we're going to hear from both sides in that story. >>> but we begin this morning with severe weather on both coasts. the weather channel's allison is in greensburg, pennsylvania. allison, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, m
to the fullest with great passion and humor and love. though her loss is devastating to those of us who held her so close and so dear, we will always be inspired by her endearing contribution to our world. her remarkable body of work in film and ongoing successes of businesswoman and her brave and relentless advocacy in the fight of hiv and aids has always made it an incredibly proud of what she has accomplished. taylor was one of the last onscreen goddesses nominated multiple times for best actress in the academy awards oscar finally came for her performance in "butterfield aaden" in the '60s. she won second time for "who's afraid of virginia woolf." her private life was every bit as dramatic as her onscreen roles. married eight times. actor richard burton became her husband twice. later in life, elizabeth -- her act career, when she published a book and focused her attention on the world's aids epidemic. . in recent years as you mentioned she struggled with her health and hospitalized the last six weeks. again, her family, her four children, ten grandchildren were by her side when she passed e
is devastating to those of us who held her so close and so dear, we will always be inspired by her enduring contribution to our world. her legacy will never fade, her spirit will always be with us, and her love will live forever in our hearts." nbc's tracie potts look at the woman behind decades of headlines. >> reporter: elizabeth taylor, a woman of breathtaking bupty, one of hollywood's last true stars. >> everything all right? did they take the money? >> reporter: "national velvet" launched taylor into the spotlight at the age of 12 and for the rest of her life the spotlight never dimmed. taylor delivered ance performances. >> charlie's coming. >> not even gods have time to give you. >> reporter: she won an oscar for a high class call girl in "bunterfield 8." >> the latin motto sick transit glory? i'm the glory. >> reporter: another for 1966 nagging drunken housewife in "who's afraid of virginia woolf." >> georgie boy didn't have the stuff. >> stop it, mother. >> like hell i will. >> i'm a very committed one. i should be committed, too, for being married so many times. >> reporter: her p
towards the libyan people. >> mike viqueira joins us now from the white house. give us more scoop behind the scenes why the president decided to come back early. there have been calls for him to return to the u.s. >> first and foremost, there's a great deal of controversy, criticism coming not only from republicans some of whom who backed the imposition of a no-fly zone and said the president had been dragging his feet to military exercises with france flying the first missions last saturday. and those on the left who say that the president has not gone through the proper channels in congress, they have -- the president has not come to congress for any sort of resolution. backers of the president said listen, there have been hundreds of u.s. assaults and attacks of this nature without any formal declaration of war even without a resolution in congress that there's that back and forth. the president was to visit some mayan ruins in el salvador, along with his family, that has been canceled now. obviously a concern brn appearances there. the president expected back in washington between 4:
again. >>> and defiance, as u.s. and allied forces pound targets in libya for a fourth straight night, moammar gadhafi emerges in public to tell his supporters he will be victorious. this as president obama heads home to work on handing over responsibility for the no-fly zone and nato finally prepares to step in after a diplomatic back and forth, all early this wednesday morning, march 23rd, back and forth, all early this wednesday morning, march 23rd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. i'm erica hill with chris wragge. we begin with this breaking news. dame elizabeth taylor has died. >> screen legend and a hollywood icon, long considered one of the most beautiful, most talented women in all of hollywood lore. just a sad day for hollywood. a woman whose life will be celebrated that's for sure. >> there's much to celebrate in that life. her publicist saying the three-time oscar winner, just as famous for her life off screen including the eight marriages and her very important humanitarian work, her publicist says she died of congestive heart failure this morning at cedars
. really the third front the u.s. is fighting on these days. it was launched by president obama to protect civilians, he said, because gadhafi's forces were bearing down on the rebels' head quarter city of benghazi. but all those cruise missiles and bombs still haven't stopped the ground fighting. the rebels were under heavy fire today about 100 miles to the south of benghazi. and as you're about to see, our own chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, was with them and got about as close as you'd ever want to. richard is back safely in benghazi tonight and is with us from there tonight. richard, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the rebels have the will, they have the numbers, but they don't have the equipment or the discipline to take on gadhafi's forces where they're dug in, as we saw for ourselves firsthand today. the road outside benghazi today is a graveyard of gadhafi's armored vehicles, destroyed by western air strikes. after an hour and a half driving south flanked by desert, we reached the rebels' front line. there are no trenches or sandbags, just men poorly arm
says the rules need to be changed immediately. >>> targeting libya. u.s. and allied forces continue air strikes for the fifth straight night, but fail to stop moammar gadhafi from attacking a key rebel-held area. and in washington, the speaker of the house takes on president obama, as to why he didn't talk to congress before launching the attacks. >>> and remembering a legend. fans, friends, and some of hollywood's biggest stars honor elizabeth taylor's work both on-screen and off as the nation mourns the passing of the big-screen icon. we're going to look back at her life and her love, "early" this thursday morning, march 24th, life and her love, "early" this thursday morning, march 24th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. i'm chris wragge. >> and i'm erica hill. boy do we have a talker of a story. >> is this a stunner or what? it tops our news this morning. we begin with the investigation of washington's reagan national airport, where air traffic controller apparently just fell asleep on the job early wedn
>>> good morning. breaking news, a u.s. f-15 fighter jet has crashed in libya. we are told they are safe. we're live with the latest. >>> significant step, the power lines have been connected to all six reactors at japan's nuclear plant. a major mile stone as crews race to try to stop the smoke, steam and radiation that is still escaping. >>> and sorry, charlie. just two weeks after giving him the boot, cbs is reportedly in talks to bring charlie sheen back to "two and a half men." but after everything each side has said, can anyone really say they're winning today tuesday, march 22nd, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a tuesday morning. it's 7:00 on the west coast. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm ann curry in for meredith. the fighter jet crashed overnight west of benghazi. >> we're being told the cause was likely mechanical. we'll get right to the story. jim miklaszewski has the story. jim, what can you tell us? >> reporter: good morning. those airmen were flying east of benghazi when their f-15 fighter jet experienced mech
and a cell phone. >>> president obama insists the u.s. had to get involved in libya to stop a massacre, and right now, secretary of state hillary clinton is in london, meeting with leaders from around the globe to figure out what to do about moammar gadhafi. here's what she said just moments ago. we don't have that, but we do have from the president last night in his nationally televised speech, where he promised ground troops would not be used to remove moammar gadhafi. and to prove that point, he took a page out of history. >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. thanks to the extraordinary sacrifices of our troops, and the determination of our diplomats, we are hopeful about iraq's future. but regime change there took eight years, thousands of american and iraqi lives, and nearly $1 trillion. that is not something we can afford to repeat in libya. >> the speech is doing little to calm gop critics this morning, including house speaker john boehner. he says americans still have no answer to the fundamental question, what does success in libya look like? and one of the presiden
, thank you for bringing us up to date there in jerusalem. >>> let's turn our attention now to libya, where moammar gadhafis forces are fighting a fierce battle in miscellaneous misrata. people are reportedly cowering in their darkened homes. this is video from tripoli, it shows anti aircraft artillery and tracer bullets being fired into the night sky. also last night, libyan tv broadcast what it said was live coverage to the nation, the first since the shelling began. he told the crowd, we'll beat 'em. nbc's richard engel is watching developments in other towns where gadhafi's forces have the upper hand. >> reporter: we are now on the rebel front line. all day we have been watching rebels, mostly in pickup trucks armed with rifles, rpgs, anti aircraft guns, rushing along this desert road, trying to take the center. gadhafi's forces, however, remain dug in the city, and are fighting back. from where we are, using this armored personnel carrier, which was destroyed by a western air strike for cover, we have been hearing and seeing incoming mortar and artillery rounds fired out. this i
crashed in libya overnight. both crew members are safe. they have been recovered by u.s. officials and we are going to be talking about that story in a little while. >> important story this morning. >> that is good news. on another note, coming up in this half hour we'll be talking about your diet questions with joy bauer. everything diet and nutrition from feeding your sweet tooth to having a mid-day snack that won't make you sleepy. we have he wille think answers for you. a little bit later on it's hard to believe but reportedly actor and warlock charlie sheen is in negotiations to go back to work on his hit sit com "two and a half men." will it happen? we'll update you on the reported talks. >> do you remember the beginning of this whole thing where he said that, mark my words, they will beg me to come back and the number is now $3 million per episode, not $2 million. i wonder what we'll find out about that. >> also this morning, especially in this economy people are looking for deals. we have more to tell you about including gourmet coffee and jewelry and also pocketbooks. apparently
't predict how long the operation will last, he did say the u.s. could transfer control of it to allied by saturday. meanwhile, house speaker boehner wrote to president obama today to complain that the mission's goals are not clearly defined. more now from mark phillips in tripoli. >> reporter: day five of the bombing campaign over libya and the combined coalition air forces have declared something like victory. >> their air force no longer exists as a fighting force. to the point that we can operat. >> reporter: control of the skies has led to near control on the ground, as moammar qaddafi's forces have learned. and as the bombing has continued, the brave face of the regime is showing some worry lines. instead of rambling on for hours as he often does, moammar qaddafi's latest pep rally's speech lasted a brief three minutes. out in public is a risky place for him to be these days. and where the obedient cheering crowds once numbered in tens of thousands, now they are often down to a few hundred, sometimes to mere dozens. even the regime's once p.r. machine is grinding down. today after
270,000 dinners to date. every one of this year's cnn heros are chosen from people you tell us about. so to nominate someone you know who is making a big difference, go to cnnheroes.com. that does it for this edition of 360. thanks for watching. piers morgan starts right now. >>> tonight, hollywood's farewell to elizabeth taylor. inside the star's exclusive sendoff. only her very closest friends and family were at the funeral. and tonight, i'll talk to two of them. the best man from one of elizabeth's eight weddings -- elizabeth's eight weddings and friends who are royalty. >>> and an exclusive interview with matthew mcconaughey, surfer dude, an actor who's romanced some of the most glamorous women on screen and off. tonight things you don't know about matthew mcconaughey. this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. elizabeth taylor did everything her way and her final farewell was no different. the star gave instructions she was to be fashionably late to her own funeral, exactly 15 minutes to be precise. and she was laid to rest near her good friend, michael jackson. the
date with judy" when she was about 15. everybody, all my friends, all of us at school, we all wanted to look like her, have the big eyebrows, and the black hair, and the beauty mark. and she was phenomenal, and i kept a scrap book on her, which is why it was so fascinating for me a few years later in hollywood to meet her at mgm in the make-up room. and that she was sew sweet, because she was showing pictures of her children to everybody. and she was very baudy. i think that's something a lot of people didn't know about her, she liked a salty turn of phrase, but then us english actresses did that. >> you shared a fall of husbands. you have 13 between you. >> that's true. and in fact the last time i got a divorce, she sent me a note and said i'm still ahead by three. i said, don't worry, liz, i'm going to catch up. i didn't call her liz, i always called her elizabeth. she didn't like being called liz. i think people had a huge amount of respect for her, the thing that was so amazing about her, most women really liked her. she was a gal's gal, you know? like carol just said, she was so
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)

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